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Conquering Hump Day, One Dropped Stitch at a Time

Owning a yarn store has transformed my husband and his attitude towards knitting. I believe he is even beginning to accept the piles of WIPs astride my piles of books that have long been dubbed my “pile of shame.” Apparently I’m concerned that at the world’s end, there will be neither enough books to read nor enough yarn to knit. So fear not! Whilst huddled in the basement with meteors and zombies in our front yard, we will be both warm and well read.

Many people ask, “What is it with all the knitting?” My husband explains, as though surveying his notes like a researcher, “it appears that once they get past the hard part, they just can’t stop.” He must really be paying attention, because what he observes is absolutely true. So many people come into the shop to buy another two skeins of gorgeously variegated wool for their 43rd garter stitch scarf only to look longingly at the ladies on the couch, the Rowan books or the newest magazines at the register and proclaim themselves “beginners” and unable to entertain an item that involves measuring.

There is a hump… a line in a knitter’s life. Life before the hump includes dropping a stitch and going to the store to have the yarn ladies pick it up for you. OR shamefully pulling out all the rows you’ve knit in order to avoid the SHAME involved in admitting that you’ve dropped said stitch!!!! I dropped a stitch this morning when a particularly enthusiastic dog hurled himself into my arms whist holding my current project. I live post hump, thank goodness, but I want to coax a few of you over the hump. I know how to correct mistakes. I learned by making more mistakes than the average person, getting completely lost and being forced to fix them.

I encourage mistake making: in life, in school, in music, in love (ok, not so much there….) and in knitting. I think we’re too afraid to screw up. What’s going to happen, folks? I encourage you to embrace your mistakes. When teaching new knitters, I like to point out that those extra yarn overs that made exactly twice as many stitches as you originally cast on is actually an advanced technique! It brings up a dialog in a lesson that helps aspiring knitters begin to be able to read their yarn. Reading your yarn is the most giant step towards getting past the hump. Go ahead and take the offending stitch off the needle. OR… if there is a mistake that is 25 rows back and it took you this long to notice it, perhaps you should embrace it as part of the fabric of your knitting journey.

In the spirit of full disclosure, taking away the shame of returning to your LYS with sunglasses, head bowed low and knitting stowed in a Giant Eagle bag, I will be displaying my first knitting project in the store.

 

IMG_2508

 

 

 

 

Let’s just say that I advanced to short rows in this project. It’s still a scarf, and my daughter wore it because her mom knit it for her.

So love your knitting journey, go forth without fear and embrace your mistakes… hump day will arrive much sooner that way.

Where Worlds Collide

March 6, 2014

Since absolutely nothing is accomplished by avoidance, something I always tell voice students, I am tackling the first blog post.  Blogging, selfies… they seem completely incongruous with my WASPy, good-girl upbringing:  trumpet blowing is not encouraged.

This has been a heady two weeks.  I have been both elated and overwhelmed.  Most important, everyone has been patient and warm:  glad to see a good business continue to serve both clientele and community. In my most stressful moments, I am buoyed by their relieved faces and gracious welcome.

Last night, Barb (a Tuesday night regular) spent some time with me and brought up an interesting question:  Why did someone who has never run a retail business, take on such a brave change? Brave? After 25+ years singing on the opera stage and 5+ years in Academia? I don’t think it’s a question of bravery.

When people who know me from my previous incarnation, “The Artist Formerly Known as….” in the opera world, they seem surprised to see me in this new role.  It never occurred to me that these were such different fields. I consider myself a facilitator (some might say:  supplier, enabler).  In all of my roles I always like to regard what I do as a gift, wrapped in beautiful packaging.  Performing, teaching, knitting, selling, it involves drawing someone into my world from the outside.  How does that happen?  I think it’s really an inexplicable, infectious joy for whatever you are doing. People want IN on joy.  To be honest, I want in on joy, too.

The answer for me was where my joy was beginning to lie.  Like taking sheet music full of lines and black dots, adding your vocal timbre, emotional interpretation, time and effort and transforming it into something personal, tangible to the ear and eye, yarn requires transformation.  It is singular and beautiful on its own, but through the imagination and (semi) capable hands of anyone will gloriously transforms itself into something wholly unique.  Like a conductor or music coach, a knitter requires someone to coax her imagination beyond just the instinctual draw to reproduce a pattern in a photo.

My joy will not be exclusive and I will not fear change that has come from within.  There is room for all of it. Transformation of black dots on staves or black dots on charts into glorious unique creations requires one thing: a facilitator. So, perhaps now I shall return to the concert hall as a slightly over-educated listener of music, accompanied by my current WIP, tucked to my right, in a rear-of-house, aisle seat.  There, I will glance across the aisle to see you: a teacher, accountant, doctor, dog-walker or retiree, hands subtly gliding yarn around needles: where my worlds collide.

Please feel free to share your story of transformation through knitting here, or to me in an email: lknoopvery@knitone.biz

Laura

 

 

 

 

Madeline Tosh Patterns

TML -

Tenerezza (cardigan) – 4 euros  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/tenerezza
Color Affection (shawl) – 3.9 euros  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/color-affection
Slow Line (cardigan)  -  4.9 euros  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/slow-line *
Sport -
Manu (cardigan) – 4.5 GBP  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/manu
Vitamin D (cardigan) – $6.50  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/vitamin-d
Water and Stone (cardigan) – 4.9 euros  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/water-and-stone
Charleston Tea (cardigan) – $6.50  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/charleston-tea
DK -
Vintage –
Romy (cardigan) – 4.5 euros  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/romy-2 *
Moonstruck (cardigan) – $6.50  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/moonstruck
Driven (cardigan) – 4.9 euros  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/driven *
Worsted or DK -
Bulle (little girl dress/top) – $5.50  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/bulle
TML or Sport -
Leftie (shawlette) – 3.6 euros http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/leftie *
Daybreak – (shawl) – $6  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/daybreak *
Sport or DK -
FREE PATTERNS!!
Vintage or DK or Sport -
Purl Ridge Scarf (beginner) – 1 or 2 skeins http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/purl-ridge-scarf *
Saroyan Scarf/Shawl (intermediate) – http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/saroyan *
The Lonely Tree Shawl (intermediate) – http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/the-lonely-tree-shawl *
Doubled DK or TML -
Luxe Cowl (beginner) – 2 skeins http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/luxe-cowl
DK or Sport -
Textured Shawl Recipe (intermediate) 2 skeins – http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/textured-shawl-recipe
Mara Shawl (begin/inter) 2 skeins – http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/mara-3 *
TML -
Holden Shawl (intermediate) 1 skein (plus trim color?) – http://www.ravelry.com/projects/ivysphotomom/holden-shawlette *
Cove Shawl (beg/inter) 1 skein – http://www.ravelry.com/projects/ivysphotomom/cove-shawl *
TML or Sport -
The Crow Waltz Shawl – (intermediate)  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/the-crow-waltz-shawl
Tattered Shawl (intermediate) -  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/tattered
Azzu’s Shawl (begin/inter)  -  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/azzus-shawl
Sport -
Mothed Pullover (begin/inter) -  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/mothed
DK -
Sassymetrical Cardi (begin/inter)  -  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/sassymetrical
OpArt Baby Blanket (inter) – http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/opart
DK, Sport or TML -
Looped Loop Cowl (beginner)  -  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/looped-loop
Boneyard Shawl – (begin/inter) – http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/boneyard-shawl *

Newsletter 10/22/2012

Tape yarn with Sequins 

 

Free Pattern 

   

 

 

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 New Yarn from Malabrigo

  

Worsted Weight                      Rios                  Arroyo

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Link from Berroco

Knit a scarf in one evening!!! 

Free Pattern

  

  

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 Mountain Colors Teton

chunky weight yarn – perfect for hats and scarves 

 

 

  

 

 

     

 

 

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Addi Clicks Back in Stock

     

 

 

 

  

 

 

 knitting classes bar

  

 

Twist and Flounce Scarf Class with Wendy

One skein of deliciously soft Baby Alpaca is all you need to create this elegant crossover scarf.

After Wendy guides you through the textured stitch pattern, you’ll have this  

worked up in no time and ready for holiday gift-giving!

Class fee: $25, plus supplies and $4 for the downloadable pattern.

Skills needed: must be able to knit, purl, and cast on.

Choose 1 session: Sunday, November 4 3-5 PM OR

Sunday, November 18 from 3-5 PM.

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Reversible Cable Scarf

 

 

Learn how easy it is to make cables while making this classic, reversible

cabled scarf. This could be the

perfect holiday gift to knit for that special someone – or yourself!

Sunday, October 28, 3-5 PM

$25 plus materials – yarn, needles, stitch markers-free pattern 

 

 

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Knitting with Wendy

 

Join Wendy for either a private or group knitting class.

Beginner, Advanced Beginner and Intermediate classes

 

$25 per class 

Call for times

412-421-6666 

   

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Classes with Mary

 

 

Habu Jewelry  

     

nn

  (materials:  1 cone Habu, 2 colors of beads, Habu kit (bead needle, sterling earring   

wires $5 through Mary), pattern $6.50, #5-8 wooden db. pointed needles.)     

November 23  Thursday  6 – 8 pm

$25

 

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Beaded Shawl   


  
  

 

                       (materials:  1 skein of Arroyo, or similar yarn, small crochet hook, beads, stitch markers, free pattern)

Saturday 27th            1-3pm

$25

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        Top Down Baby Sweater

 

 

  (materials:  1-2 skeins Malabrigo worsted, or other similar yarn,  

needles, stitch markers, free pattern)

October 28 Sunday  1-3 pm
$25

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 Adult Hats

 

(materials:  1 skein of worsted wt. yarn, various patterns either free or for sale, 

 

notions dependent upon pattern chosen)

Tuesday 30th            6-8pm  Adult Hats    

$25 

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“Mom and Me Finger Crochet Class”

all ages welcome 

November 13, Saturday at 11am.   

$12 for each participant

 

 

free patterns bar

 

 How about some arm warmers using Lodge

here

 

 Love this sweater.  If you are interested in knitting this sweater, sign up for a class to learn

how to make it.

here

 

I know it is bad luck to knit a man a sweater, but who can resist this one.

here

 

Wow! check out this link for an array of hat patterns by Louisa Harding

here

 

knitting groups bar

 

No charge—–No pressure—–No hassle

Tons of fun, tons of great conversation, tons of laughter. Groups are just generally people

 who love to knit, others try to get like-minded people together. It’s a great place to make
 friends, show off your work and your skills, or get a friendly bit of advice. Everyone is welcome!!!

Charity Knitting

 We have charity knitting  and crocheting every Sunday from 1:00-4:00pm. We supply the yarn,

you supply the needles and the willingness. We are currently knitting and

crocheting chemo caps.Unfortunately, there is a large need for these and Knit One
is trying to show cancer sufferers
that we care.Our caps are donated to those who need them

and we need all we can get.
We are
collecting caps for the Race For The Cure next year but we will also be making donations
to cancer centers throughout the area all year long.  Please help us in our efforts.If you
 can’t join us on Sundays feel free to knit or crochet one at home and bring in your caps.
And if you need yarn just let us know and we will be happy to supply some for you. 

Wednesday Knitters Group
Wednesday afternoons at 1pm. Come, share, learn and have fun..

Thursday Evening Knitting Group 6-8pm
Join knitters and crocheters every Thursday for knitting, crocheting, chatting.     

Happy Knitting, Crocheting, Spinning and Designing,

Stacey and the Staff of Knit One

test pattern

GAUGE

18 sts/24 rows = 4 inches in stockinette st
PATTERN NOTES
[Knitty's list of standard abbreviations and techniques can be found here.]

Each half of the cowl requires one skein. One cowl is made from two skeins. If you’re making it all yourself, you’ll need one skein of each color.

If you’re working with a friend, both knitters should choose a color they love, and make one of each of the two links in their chosen color.

This project uses a provisional cast on. Use your preferred provisional cast on technique; directions for one technique may be found here.

This project uses grafting. Instructions for this technique may be found here.

3 into 2 star: K3tog leaving sts on left needle, p3tog into same sts and drop from left needle.

3 into 3 star: K3tog leaving sts on left needle, yo, k3tog again into same sts and drop from left needle.

1 into 15: [K1, (yo, k1) 7 times] into same st, drop st from left needle. 15 sts created from 1.

p5tog: Purl 5 together.

m5: With tip of left needle pick up strand between st just worked and next st from front to back, and knit into the front loop; [k into the front, back and front of the next stitch], and with left needle tip pick up strand between st just worked and next st from front to back, k into this loop – 5 sts created from 1.

spacer
Cocoon Stitch:
Worked over a multiple of 8 sts + 3. Work from written or charted instructions as you prefer. Row 1 [WS]: K1, p1, [k1, p1, k5, p1] to last st, k1.

Row 2 [RS]: P1, k1, [p5, k1, p1, k1] to last st, p1.

Row 3 [WS]: K1, p1, [m5,